Labour Group Leader, Richard Watts, introduces Islington Labour's candidates for the 2014 local elections - 

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 "I'm delighted to introduce our Islington Labour team for 2014. Our candidates are all local  residents who want to continue the fight to make Islington a fairer place. Almost 40% of our  candidates are women. 14 are from black and minority ethnic backgrounds; and 7 are aged under  30. Islington Labour's candidates truly reflect our local communities.  

 "Since taking control of the Council in 2010, Islington Labour has transformed services and fought  for fairness every step of the way. From introducing free school meals for all primary school  children, to ensuring all of our staff are paid at least the London Living Wage - Islington Labour  has made a real difference.

 "After speaking with over 20,000 local residents, we have listened to what your priorities are. If  we are re-elected, we will tackle jobs, housing and the cost of living - because those are the things that matter to Islington residents and matter to us. This is because Islington Labour will always be on your side.

"Please scroll down the page and find out who your Islington Labour candidates are."  

 

Barnsbury Ward

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Jilani Chowdhury                 Mouna Hamitouche              James Murray

 

Bunhill Ward

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Troy Gallagher                    Robert Khan                       Claudia Webbe

 

Caledonian Ward

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Paul Convery                      Rupert Perry                       Una O'Halloran

 

Canonbury Ward

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 Alex Diner                          Clare Jeapes                     Nick Wayne

 

Clerkenwell Ward

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Raphael Edwards                 James Court                         Alice Donovan

 

Finsbury Park Ward

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 Gary Heather                    Mick O'Sullivan                     Asima Shaikh

 

Highbury East Ward

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Aysegul Erdogan                  Osh Gantly                       Muhammad Kalaam

 

Highbury West Ward

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Theresa Debono                 Richard Greening                Andy Hull

 

Hillrise Ward

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 Michelline Safi Ngongo         David Poyser                    Marian Spall

 

Holloway Ward

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Paul Smith                           Diarmaid Ward                  Rakhia Ismail

 

Junction Ward

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Tim Nicholls                       Kaya Makarau Schwartz       Janet Burgess

 

Mildmay Ward

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Jenny Kay                           Olly Parker                        Joe Caluori

 

St George's Ward

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Kat Fletcher                 Satnam Gill                        Nick Ward

 

St Mary's Ward

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Angela Picknell                   Gary Poole                     Nurullah Turan

 

St Peter's Ward

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Gary Doolan                       Alice Perry                          Martin Klute

 

Tollington Ward

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Richard Watts                     Jean-Roger Kaseki                Flora Williamson

Islington Labour Council Candidates

Labour Group Leader, Richard Watts, introduces Islington Labour's candidates for the 2014 local elections -   "I'm delighted to introduce our Islington Labour team for 2014. Our candidates are all local...

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Islington Labour has demanded action from banks and regulators to tackle rip-off charges at cash machines in the borough. 

There are over 120 pay-to-use cash machines in Islington, where charges are often £2 per transaction. Research by Islington Labour has found that pay-to-use cash machines are clustered in the most deprived areas of the borough. In contrast, more free-to-use cash machines can be found in the more affluent parts of Islington.

People living in an area like the Andover Estate, one of the most deprived communities in our borough, are facing financial penalties simply for withdrawing their own money. The most common charge at the eight pay-to-use cash machines in this area is £2. That means that a typical £20 cash withdrawal comes with a 10% charge. For someone claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance, if they visit a cash machine three times a week withdrawing £20 each time, they will be charged £6 per week or a shocking £312 a year. 

Cllr Richard Watts, Leader of Islington Council, attacked the rip-off cash machine charges saying: 

“The extortionate charges facing thousands of residents in Islington are outrageous. People are being penalised simply for withdrawing their own money. We need to improve access to free-to-use cash machines and I have called on the banks and the Government’s financial regulator to get a grip of this issue.”

“These crippling charges are made all the more perverse when you realise that within a seven minute walk of the home of Tory Mayor Boris Johnson, there are fourteen free-to-use cash machines. This is compared with only two within seven minutes of the Andover Estate. Wealthy individuals can access their money without being ripped-off, but people with less money to start with face steep charges to access their own money.”

Cllr Watts has kicked-off his campaign by writing to the British Bankers Association urging them to encourage the banks to make it easier for people to access their money for free. Cllr Watts has also applied pressure on the operator of the UK’s cash machine network, Link, to install more free-to-use cash machines in areas of Islington which currently have poor access.

Cllr Watts has also called on the Government regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority, to take its responsibility to people in deprived communities more seriously and to look urgently at what can be done to bring down charges at pay-to-use cash machines.

Pictured above - Islington Labour Councillors and local residents outside a rip-off cash machine on Seven Sisters Road.  

Islington Labour heads campaign against rip-off cash machines

  Islington Labour has demanded action from banks and regulators to tackle rip-off charges at cash machines in the borough.  There are over 120 pay-to-use cash machines in Islington, where...

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Islington Labour's Executive Member for Housing, Cllr James Murray (Barnsbury Ward), has been named in 24 Housing magazine's Top 50 Housing Power Players for 2014. 

The annual list was compiled from the votes of more than 200 senior housing figures. The list acts as a barometer of the most influential and inspirational people working in, or impacting on, the housing sector.

Cllr Murray is listed at number 44 and is the only councillor in the list – and is five places ahead of Richard Blakeway, the Deputy Mayor of London for Housing!

An article about the list can be viewed by clicking here. 

Cllr Murray is described as, "doing more than anyone else to promote council housebuilding at genuinely affordable rents rather than the government's version of it, according to one of those who voted for him. Cllr Murray, first elected to Islington Council in 2006, is a passionate believer in developing new homes at rents which low-income residents in pricey Islington can afford and has pioneered deals to unlock sites with council subsidy to allow for social rents."

Well done, James! 

Islington Labour Housing Chief in Top 50 Housing Power Players

Islington Labour's Executive Member for Housing, Cllr James Murray (Barnsbury Ward), has been named in 24 Housing magazine's Top 50 Housing Power Players for 2014.  The annual list was compiled...

AndyHull.jpgArsenal FC’s 60,000-seat Emirates stadium is in the sliver of north London I’m elected to represent. Gooners, as the club’s fans are known, pay some of the highest ticket prices in the land to watch matches there, swelling the coffers of the sixth biggest football brand in the world. Mesut Őzil, one of their star players, is paid £130,000 a week. The club’s Chief Executive, Ivan Gazidis, takes home £2 million a year. And yet hundreds of staff who work at the Emirates get paid well below the Living Wage, which in London is £8.80 an hour. Some of them are directly employed by Arsenal; others are the club’s contractors, employed by companies like Delaware North. They include caterers, cleaners, porters, programme sellers and stewards.

John F Kennedy once asked a cleaner at NASA what they did. They replied, ‘I help put men on the moon’. Everyone who works at the Emirates, in whatever guise, is a part of Team Arsenal. ‘Victory through teamwork’ is the club’s Latin motto, emblazoned in giant letters all around the ground. But many of its staff would have to work full-time for seven years to earn what Őzil does in seven days.

Citizens UK, who have led the Living Wage campaign since 2001, have lobbied the club for over six months now to become a Living Wage employer, meeting with senior Arsenal executives and asking questions at the club’s Annual General Meeting. We at Islington Council have written to the club repeatedly over the same period to urge them to follow our lead by going Living Wage. These meetings and letters have borne no fruit. Arsenal’s position, for now, is that unless the law is changed to force them to pay the Living Wage, they won’t.

The club cites four excuses for this, none of which wash. First, they argue that some people working at the club have second jobs. We point out that this is because they have to, as they are not paid enough for one job to make ends meet. Second, they say that workers’ remuneration packages as a whole add up to more than the Living Wage. But the Living Wage campaign is about cash in a worker’s pocket, which they can spend freely, not other perks. Third, they complain that the campaign is too political. We say that if tackling the scourge of working poverty in one of the world’s most expensive cities is political, then so be it. Finally, they point out that many of the workers in question are contractors, and so suggest it’s the contracting companies’ problem, not the club’s. We think this is an abject abrogation of responsibility when these staff are working on Arsenal’s premises on Arsenal’s behalf.     

Islington Council’s civic leadership on this issue has meant that the borough now has the highest concentration of accredited Living Wage employers anywhere in the country. They include public sector organisations like Ambler School and Children’s Centre, charities like Child Poverty Action Group and private companies ranging from large city firms such as Slaughter & May to small enterprises like Schools Offices Services and Casual Films. Over five per cent of all accredited Living Wage employers in the UK are in Islington. But Arsenal FC, one of the wealthiest and highest profile organisations in the borough, is not one of them. It’s shameful. But it doesn’t have to be this way. 

Arsenal could be the first Living Wage team in the Premiership, the most lucrative football league in the world. It could lead the way by showing that fair play on the pitch can be matched by fair pay off it. If it did, it would earn resounding plaudits not only from thousands of fans and from local residents here in Highbury and Holloway but also from all those nationally and internationally who campaign against poverty pay. In doing so, it would join the ranks of over 550 accredited Living Wage employers who have between them put £210 million of additional wages into the pockets of hard working people, lifting 40,000 families out of working poverty. For hundreds of workers at the club, it would mean earning enough to live on, not just enough to survive. It would mean a decent wage, not a handout, affirming the dignity of work. Most importantly, it would mean quitting that second job, getting some sleep and spending some time with their family.

So, despite Mr Gazidis’s misguided reluctance, we call upon the fans, the manager, the board, the sponsors and past and present players to join with us in urging Arsenal FC to do the right thing. Arsenal should pay the Living Wage, because no-one should have to do a hard day’s work for less than they can live on, especially at one of the richest football clubs on earth.

This article was originally published on the Football Beyond Borders website - http://fbeyondborders.tumblr.com

Cllr Andy Hull is a Labour Member for Highbury West and the Executive Member for Finance at Islington Council. He tweets at @AndyHull79.

Arsenal Should Pay The Living Wage

Arsenal FC’s 60,000-seat Emirates stadium is in the sliver of north London I’m elected to represent. Gooners, as the club’s fans are known, pay some of the highest ticket prices...

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Today (Thursday 20th March), Cllr. Watts Leader of Islington Council, Cllr. Phil Jones Camden’s Cabinet member for Sustainability & Transport and Assembly Member Jeannette Arnold visited City Hall to demand a meeting with Mayor Boris Johnson regarding air quality in the two boroughs.

Earlier this year Cllr. Watts and Cllr. Jones wrote a joint letter to the Mayor requesting a meeting on the issue which he refused to accept.

Cllr. Watts said:

‘After ignoring our request for a meeting, we came to City Hall today to demand that Boris Johnson introduces measures to improve the air quality in Islington and Camden.

Air quality is something we take very seriously and we are doing everything we can, but we need Boris Johnson to stop sitting on his hands over this issue.

The Mayor of London through TFL is responsible for most of the damaging air pollution in our boroughs through the major road networks and the high polluting buses, lorries and taxis that he controls. So he has to take action if we’re to really make a difference.”

Assembly Member Jennette Arnold said:

“Boris has shown time and again his apathy towards properly addressing the major issues we have in London when it comes to Air Quality. If the Mayor doesn’t start taking this matter seriously and putting in place measures to address the poor quality of air we have in London, then we could be heading for a similar scenario to the extreme measures that we’ve seen authorities take recently across the Channel in Paris.”  

Islington and Camden head to City Hall to Lobby Boris Johnson over air quality

Today (Thursday 20th March), Cllr. Watts Leader of Islington Council, Cllr. Phil Jones Camden’s Cabinet member for Sustainability & Transport and Assembly Member Jeannette Arnold visited City Hall to demand...

 Fairness in tough times

andyhull.jpgMary’s a single mum who lives on a council estate here in Islington with her three children, Josh, aged 9, Michael, 18, and Lisa, who’s 20*.

They used to live in an overcrowded property, at least one bedroom short of what the family really needed. It was hard for her kids to do their homework, growing up in such cramped conditions, and Mike’s asthma was made worse by the condensation and mould that they couldn’t get rid of.

Now, Mary and her family live in a brand new flat on the same estate which she got first dibs on through the Local Lettings scheme, and where she pays Social Rent, which is a third of what some of her neighbours seem to pay private landlords for similar flats in the block next door. 

Mary works as a cleaner for the Council. She used to be employed by a private contractor at not much above the Minimum Wage: now she does the same job, but works for the Council itself, and gets paid the full London Living Wage of £8.80 an hour. She knows that one of the reasons her wages went up is because the Chief Executive’s pay got cut by £50,000 to pay for it, closing the gap a bit between those at the bottom and those at the top of the Town Hall. So now she only has to work one job, unlike before, when she had to do catering at the Emirates on match days as well to make ends meet. So, she gets to spend a bit more time with her kids at weekends and can afford the odd Christmas present, which makes a world of difference at that time of year. When she’s asked about the difference an extra quid or two an hour has made, she uses words like ‘earnt’ and ‘dignity’.

She’s got two other friends who’ve had a pay-rise these last couple of years as well: Nathan, who’s a security guard, and Jessie, who’s a dinner lady at a local school. Her friend Moira, who does home care visits, says she might get a pay rise too, in the summer. About time, Mary figures, given there aren’t many jobs more important than Moira’s, looking after our grandmas and granddads when they can no longer look after themselves.

Mary’s had her fair share of money troubles though, and her son Mike has too – he’s a lot like his mum. So she’s been grateful for the support she’s got on how to deal with debt from the folk at the new Citizens Advice Bureau that opened up on Upper Street. They referred Michael onto the Fit Money programme too, where he’s been learning a bit about how to manage his money as well. She’d got into trouble before, borrowing from The Money Shop in Finsbury Park when there always seemed to be too much month at the end of her money. She heard about the local Credit Union though through some colleagues at the Council, and now she puts away a few pounds at the end of each month into a savings account there, through payroll. It’s not much, but it means that she’s been able to take out what they call a Saver Loan at sensible rates. The Council even put £40 into her savings account to help her get started. She realises now that the interest she was having to pay The Money Shop was a total rip-off. It makes her want to spit whenever she walks past there these days and they’re handing out branded balloons to mums with prams. 

Mary’s kids aren’t perfect, but they mean the world to her, and now their futures are looking a bit brighter, she says. Michael got some mentoring in his last year at school, which seemed to really help with his confidence, and he’s had a work experience placement that the Council helped set up, which helped him see that working is a damned sight better than sitting on the dole like his dad used to, feeling like he wasn’t up to much. Now Michael goes to college, and, although the government cut the Educational Maintenance Allowance, he gets £300 a year from the Council in the form of a bursary to buy the books and kit he needs.

Lisa’s currently doing an apprenticeship at a City firm who are in some sort of partnership with the Council, learning how the systems work behind that all-important Reception desk. She can see herself working there full-time in the future, but knows she’ll have to knuckle down and impress as an apprentice first, ‘cos the job market’s really tough.

Meanwhile, Josh’s marks are improving at school. Mary knew he had it in him. But getting a proper hot meal every day for lunch has definitely helped, and his classmate Ryan’s less disruptive too, now he’s off the Lucozade and out of the Chicken Shop. The best thing is, the food is free. And because everyone gets it, Josh and his mates don’t have to worry about whose mum can afford to buy them dinner and whose can’t. At a saving of over £300 a year, not having to find the cash for school dinners is a godsend. Josh is also reading a lot more than he used to, after he took part in some ‘Word’ festival last year at school. Although the books were on the back burner over half term last week, ‘cos Josh was out all day playing footie with his pal, Aaron, on a new pitch that just got built on what was a bit of waste land on the estate around the corner where he lives.

If you ask Mary, she’ll always tell you the Council should be investing in young people, as Islington’s future. In fact, Mary reckons that you’ve got to get to ‘em when they’re really young – in that crucial first year, or even beforehand when they’re still just a bump – to make the biggest difference to how they end up later on. Josh certainly benefited from his Sure Start Children’s Centre – Mary just wishes, for the sake of her friends with young children, that there were more affordable childcare around. She knows though that children’s centres are getting closed down up North, where her brother lives, and she’s glad that isn’t happening here.

God knows how she finds the time, but Mary’s also been doing a bit of volunteering this winter, looking out for some of the older people on her estate when it’s been cold. Good Neighbours, they call it. It’s meant she’s met a few people she might never have done otherwise as well, from the other side of the road, where the houses are proper posh. She thinks the idea though that people with a bit of time or money should chip in to help out in the community is spot on. Islington Giving they call it, she says.

All in all, Mary reckons that Islington isn’t a bad place to bring up her family these days. She’s a bit wary of words like Fairness, as she figures it means different things to different people, and she’s never really been one for high-faluting Commissions, whatever they are. But if it means leveling the playing field a bit, so her kids have as good a chance to get on as those across the road, and if it means focusing a bit on those who are struggling because they need it most, then it’s alright by her…

You can read the paper on tonight’s agenda about the progress we’ve made, implementing the recommendations of the Islington Fairness Commission. There are lots of impressive words and numbers in it. But, in between the lines, I hope you can read stories like Mary’s. Because those stories are out there, on every street, from Archway down to Finsbury and from the Cally Road to Clissold Park. They’re what local politics is all about. They show that ‘on your side’ and ‘fairness in tough times’ are not just empty rhetoric. We are making a difference. Let’s keep it up...

 * This fictional family illustrates the real impact the Fairness Commission has had.

This speech was delivered at last week's full council meeting. Cllr Andy Hull co-chaired the Islington Fairness Commission and is now Islington Council’s Executive Member for Finance and Performance. He tweets at @AndyHull79

Fairness in Tough Times

 Fairness in tough times Mary’s a single mum who lives on a council estate here in Islington with her three children, Josh, aged 9, Michael, 18, and Lisa, who’s 20*....

Cllr Janet Burgess, Deputy Leader and Executive Member for Health & Wellbeing, has won the ‘Age UK Award’ at the prestigious LGiU and CCLA annual Councillor Achievement Awards.

The award recognises councillors who ‘make change happen on issues of concern to older people’. In awarding the honour, Judges said they felt that Cllr Burgess set an excellent example to others on issues such as ending 15 minute care visits. In shortlisting they also recognised her efforts to introduce the council’s first Older People’s Champions, offer free swimming for all over 60s in all Islington funded leisure centres and protect social care for people with moderate needs.  Last year, Islington became the joint first local authority in the country to sign Unison’s Ethical Care Charter and commit to ending poverty pay for home care workers with new contracts that pay the London Living Wage.

Cllr Janet Burgess said: "I am really honoured to collect this award for the work we are doing in Islington to support older people.  In Islington there is a high level of poverty among pensioners, so despite massive government cuts helping them both through the Council and via voluntary groups is really important." 

The winners were announced last night (Tuesday 25th February) at a ceremony in the Lord Mayor’s Parlour at Westminster City Hall. 

It is the third year in a row that Islington’s Labour Councillors achievements have been celebrated.  Last year, Cllr Catherine West collected ‘Leader of the Year’ and Cllr Joe Caluori  won the Bruce-Lockhart Member Scholarship.  In 2012, Cllr Andy Hull won ‘Scrutineer of the Year’ for his groundbreaking work on Islington’s Fairness Commission, the first in the country.  

 

 

Islington’s Cllr Janet Burgess wins Age UK honour at LGiU Councillor Achievement Awards

Cllr Janet Burgess, Deputy Leader and Executive Member for Health & Wellbeing, has won the ‘Age UK Award’ at the prestigious LGiU and CCLA annual Councillor Achievement Awards. The award...

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Deposits of private renters are held in the government backed Tenancy Deposit Scheme. A significant amount of money has accumulated from unclaimed tenant’s deposits since the scheme was launched in 2007. The Tenancy Deposit Scheme now intends to donate this money to charities that provide education and training to improve standards of behaviour and practice among private landlords and tenants.

While we welcome the news that this money will fund training and education, we believe that a large portion should be donated to charities and other organisations, like Shelter or the Citizen’s Advice Bureaux, which provide advice and support to private renters. The Tenancy Deposit Scheme should also look into making the money available to the rising number of private tenants organisations in London and across the country.

London’s housing crisis has seen a rise in tenants paying large sums of money for sub-standard accommodation. This money, which after all comes from the pockets of private tenants to, should be used to help renters in crisis and actively encourage tenants to get organised and know their rights.

Cllr Alice Perry, Labour & Islington Private Tenants

Standing Up For Islington Private Tenants

Deposits of private renters are held in the government backed Tenancy Deposit Scheme. A significant amount of money has accumulated from unclaimed tenant’s deposits since the scheme was launched in...

Cllr Janet Burgess, Deputy Leader and Executive Member for Health & Wellbeing, has been shortlisted for the ‘Age UK Award’ at the prestigious LGiU and CCLA annual Councillor Achievement Awards.

The award recognises councillors who ‘make change happen on issues of concern to older people’ and in shortlisting Cllr Burgess the judging panel highlighted her efforts to introduce the council’s first Older People’s Champions, offer free swimming for all over 60s in all Islington funded leisure centres and protect social care for people with moderate needs.  Last year, Islington became the joint first local authority in the country to sign Unison’s Ethical Care Charter and commit to ending poverty pay for home care workers with new contracts that pay the London Living Wage.

Cllr Janet Burgess said: "I am really honoured to be nominated for this award for the work we are doing in Islington to support older people.  In Islington there is a high level of poverty among pensioners, so despite massive government cuts helping them both through the Council and via voluntary groups is really important." 

The winners will be announced at a ceremony in the Lord Mayor’s Parlour at Westminster City Hall on Tuesday 25 January. 

It is the third year in a row that Islington’s Labour Councillors achievements have been celebrated.  Last year, Cllr Catherine West collected ‘Leader of the Year’ and Cllr Joe Caluori  won the Bruce-Lockhart Member Scholarship.  In 2012, Cllr Andy Hull won ‘Scrutineer of the Year’ for his groundbreaking work on Islington’s Fairness Commission, the first in the country.  

 

 

Islington’s Cllr Janet Burgess shortlisted for LGiU Councillor Achievement Awards

Cllr Janet Burgess, Deputy Leader and Executive Member for Health & Wellbeing, has been shortlisted for the ‘Age UK Award’ at the prestigious LGiU and CCLA annual Councillor Achievement Awards....

I'm really delighted that Government figures released today have confirmed that 63.2% of pupils in the borough achieved five A*- C grades – including the key subjects of English and Maths – in 2013.

The transformation in our secondary schools over recent years has been nothing short of amazing, and these results are a validation of all the hard work undertaken by pupils and teachers. I'm particularly pleased that Islington have improved significantly faster than the national rate over the last five years, and by a whopping 10 percentage points in the past year alone!

Despite a drop across England, we have seen an increase in the level of students attaining top grades (three or more A – A* grades)

Islington is joint-top in the country for the number of secondary schools rated as either ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted, with all of our secondary schools achieving good or outstanding status.

At a time when Michael Gove and the Tory-led Government seem hell-bent on dismantling our education system, the experience of Islington’s ‘Community of Schools’ model clearly shows that with strong support from the local authority, strong leadership from heads and commitment from Governors, community schools can and will succeed.

It’s important to remember, beyond the league tables and number crunching,  that these results represent better outcomes for Islington children and will give our pupils greater opportunities to thrive and achieve their ambitions.

The challenge to all of us now is to sustain and improve on these results in future years!

Cllr Joe Caluori

Executive Member for Children and Families Labour Member for Mildmay Ward, LB Islington

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Islington celebrates best ever GCSE results

I'm really delighted that Government figures released today have confirmed that 63.2% of pupils in the borough achieved five A*- C grades – including the key subjects of English and...

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